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I find this very interesting that there are some people in the city of Beacon saying “we do not have a gang problem or violent crime problem or a drug problem”


SO I DID SOME LOOKING THIS IS SOME OF WHAT I FOUND


1. Oct 26, 2006 Officer Hopper was shot at "point blank range


2. 2009 summer We had the gang fight and a person was stabbed on church street


3. December 2009 Beacon Police charged a guy with first-degree gang assault,


4. Mar 16, 2009 16 are charged in Beacon brawl


5. 9:30 p.m. Monday 12 April 2010 near Building 4 of the South Davies Terrace apartment complex a fight and stabbing with the end
results a second-degree murder charge.


6. Apr 8, 2010 from Poughkeepsie Journal Four
Beacon
residents are scheduled to appear in City of Beacon
Court on Thursday on drug-related charges, according to the Duchess
County Drug Task Force



Now I do understand the Beacon police are doing a good job with all the budget and man power the way it is (THANKS EVERYONE) but perhaps they could use some help. We have the naburhood watch that Kathy Deutermann started
(A BIG HELP TO BEACON) but it is not covering all of Beacon and she does need
more help to get more people involved.


We would like to see a Garden Angle group started here in Beacon that would help as eyes and ears for the police department. If a group is indeed started I would hope and pray that the city council and Beacon police
department would welcome them with open arms and work with them to clean up are
streets of crime for everyone before it spirals out of control in the future
hot summer months and beyond


Ray & Sue Clary



June 2, 2009



Cities in the United States got safer in 2008, while small towns grew more dangerous, according to FBI data released Monday. The FBI says violent crime nationwide
dropped by 2.5 percent last year. Property crimes also fell, by 1.6 percent,
according to the preliminary data collected by the FBI. Cities with more than 1
million people saw homicides fall by 4.3 percent; cities with 500,000 to 1
million people saw homicides fall by almost 8 percent. Yet in towns with fewer
than 10,000 residents, homicides rose 5.5 percent, rape increased 1.4 percent,
and robbery 3.9 percent.

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Comment by RAY CLARY on April 28, 2010 at 3:25pm
PERHAPS THIS WILL BE THE ANSWER TO THE DRUGS AND VIOLENT CRIME NY HAS THE LAWS YES BUT NOT REALLY ENFORCED IF ONE TO FIVE IS ALL THEY GET

WHEN THEY GET OUT THEY ARE BACK AT IT AGAIN WITH A RAP SHEET TO BRAG ABOUT

PHOENIX " Favoring the constitutional right to bear arms over others' concerns about gun safety, Gov. Jan Brewer on Friday signed into law a bill making Arizona the third state allowing people to carry a concealed weapon without requiring a permit.
The measure takes effect 90 days after the current legislative session ends, which likely puts the effective date in July or August.
"I believe this legislation not only protects the Second Amendment rights of Arizona citizens, but restores those rights as well," Brewer, a Republican, said in a statement.
Alaska and Vermont now do not require permits to carry concealed weapons.
By eliminating the permit requirement, the Arizona legislation will allow people 21 or older to forego background checks and classes that are now required.
Supporters say the bill promotes constitutional rights and allows people to protect themselves from criminals, while critics worry it will lead to more shootings as people with less training have fewer restrictions on carrying weapons.
Some police officials are concerned the law will lead to more accidental gun discharges from people untrained in firearm safety, or that shooters in stressful situations will accidentally strike innocent bystanders with stray bullets.
"I know a lot of 21-year-olds; the maturity level is gravely concerning sometimes," said El Mirage Police Chief Mike Frazier, an Arizona Association of Chiefs of Police board member. "If you're going to be carrying a weapon you should know what the law is and how to use it."
However, the measure was supported by police unions representing rank-and-file officers, who said their best friend on the streets is a law-abiding citizen equipped to protect themselves or others.
The police chiefs group initially opposed the bill but then took a neutral stance after some provisions were changed at their request. Brewer's office also participated in negotiations on changes to the bill.
A Democratic leader, Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, of Phoenix, said the bill deprives law enforcement of a tool "to separate good guys from the bad guys." With a permit requirement, police encountering a person with a concealed gun but no permit had reason to suspect that person was not a law-abiding citizen, she said.
The Arizona Citizens Defense League, a gun-rights group that lobbied for passage of the "constitutional carry" bill, said gun owners foregoing permits still should get training. "The heaviest thing about wearing a firearm is the responsibility that comes with it," the group said.
Arizona's permissive gun laws gained national attention last year when a man openly carried a semiautomatic rifle to a Phoenix protest outside a speech by President Barack Obama.
Nearly all adults can already carry a weapon openly in Arizona, and supporters of looser laws argue that gun owners shouldn't face additional restrictions just because they want to hide the weapon.
Currently, carrying a hidden firearm without a permit is a misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $2,500.
Forty-five other states require permits for hidden guns, and two states " Illinois and Wisconsin " prohibit them altogether.
Federal law requires anyone buying a gun from a licensed dealer to undergo a background check, but that requirement does not apply to sales by individuals who aren't dealers. Arizona's law won't change that.
Under the Arizona legislation, people carrying a concealed weapon will be required to tell a police officer that if asked, and the officer can temporarily take the weapon while communicating with the person.
More than 154,000 people have permits to carry a concealed weapon in Arizona.
The bill acted on by Brewer was the first attempt to lift the permit requirement to reach an Arizona governor's desk.
Brewer's predecessor, Democrat Janet Napolitano, in 2007 vetoed two related bills. One would have reduced penalties for carrying a concealed weapon without a permit. The other would have allowed a person without a permit to carry a gun largely concealed as long as any part of it or its holster was visible.
Brewer in 2008 signed into law a bill allowing a person with a permit to take a gun into a restaurant or bar serving alcohol as long as the establishment doesn't prohibit it and the person isn't drinking alcohol. Napolitano vetoed a similar bill in 2005.
Comment by Henry on April 28, 2010 at 2:53pm
Doesn't New York state have some of the toughest drug laws in the country?
Comment by RAY CLARY on April 27, 2010 at 10:05pm
IT IS NOT THE PD'S FAULT AS I SEE IT BUT THE LAWS THEY ALL JUST GET A SLAP ON THE WRIST AND LET GO IN ONE TO FIVE YEARS TO GO DO IT AGAIN
Comment by Steve Knowles on April 27, 2010 at 7:54pm
Drug sales are so open and obvious in Beacon it is pitiful! Until a couple of years ago, people would openly sell drugs on Main street in front of the diner and elsewhere. The owners of a business nearby told me at the time that they called our esteemed Beacon police to report sales occuring on the sidewalk in front of their business. The police responded with "is it on your property?", when told no, they responded with, "then we can't do anything about it". Really! I am not making this up! I called the Dutchess County drug task force with that story, and within a few weeks, the open sales, at least on Main street, appeared to stop.

My opinion of the Beacon police is that one, or more, of the following explanations for their total disregard for drug sales is at work:

1) they are the most incompetant police force possible
2) they are the most apathetic police force possible
3) they are the most corrupt police force possible

There is no good reason for what they allow to occur under everyone's noses here in Beacon. Illegal drug activity is the most dangerous crime affecting Beacon. All the vehicle tickets they write do not protect the community. Allowing the illegal drug trade here DOES put us all in danger. Just ask the victim of a stray bullet a half mile away from a shooting if you think illegal drug activity only affects the users and pushers (a rationalization that is often used by police to either just overlook it, or make money from it)

So now I'll be on their bad list. I've had nothing but bad experiences with Beacon police since I moved here 11 years ago; and that's only involving reporting crime, or in one case, yelling at the residents of a house across the street from mine, where 911 was called for a drug overdose. I yelled out to the home's occupant as a Beacon police officer left, "we're tired of the drug activity in this neighborhood. We have children here. You need to stop!" (or something like that) Next thing I knew, this little Beacon police officer with a Napolean complex was in my face, yelling at me to "Never mess with an investigation I am conducting!" I'm sure if I had said anything, I would have been taken to the ground with a night-stick pushed in my face. The EMTs standing nearby appeared to have the look of "great, here we go again", but would likely have not backed me up if I had brought charges against the officer (if he had forced me down). That's the more drastic of the interactions I have had with the Beacon police over the years.

Hopefully the thousand members of beacon citizen will read this, and it will have been worth posting. Cheers!

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