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Anyone else getting dirt coming out of their tap water? Had quite a bit of it this morning. Have not found any problems with our plumbing as of yet. We are on the south end of town in the Dutchess Junction area. Wondering if this is an isolated problem, if there might be work going on up the line or part of a larger concern. Busy signal at the Water Dept. and nothing on the city website.

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South of 9D here near Sargent School, other side of the Fishkill from you, no problems.

If there is a problem with municipal pipes, this is the kind of weather it would happen in.

Thanks for the feedback. Still trying to narrow down the possibilities. 

Ben Royce said:

South of 9D here near Sargent School, other side of the Fishkill from you, no problems.

If there is a problem with municipal pipes, this is the kind of weather it would happen in.

I think the extreme cold may be causing ground shifting, which could flex the water lines enough to cause sediment in the lines to be dislodged/re-suspended.  Just a guess.

Yes this kind of weather is hard on the infrastructure. Good news is that the Beacon Water Dept. came to check things out first thing Monday morning. Bad news is, no definitive answer. Still many possibilities but I think it is important to share available information on conditions so those affected can deal with a potentially larger problem. We often take for granted the simple things, like clean water, that requires a lot of work to maintain.

A bigger concern I've had for years is the chlorine level of Beacon water.  At our house, off Sargent Avenue (Sycamore Drive), tap water smells like highly chlorinated pool water!  The chlorine level is so high that a Britta filter won't remove it all.  I'm thinking of getting a pool chlorine test kit to measure the level, and then compare that with whatever standards there might be.  I used to work at a water treatment plant in Florida, and the goal was to have some measurable level of chlorine in the water at the delivery end throughout the system.  The theory being that if there is a measurable level of chlorine coming out of the tap, the chlorine has done its job at disinfecting along the way.  Lazy water treatment would involve putting in so much chlorine you don't even have to ever measure at the taps.

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